Link dump

Thursday, February 23, 2006

Be National

We must have for everything a national version AND I really don’t understand why. We have national car, national engine, national dress, national plane, national media and….

Most of these nationalities are not economical but they are still persisting on this policy:


So ladies and gentlemen I introduce you our last product
National internet (N.I)
Yes even our internet is national .we want to spend 1 milliard $ for set up this amazing internet for you in Iran.
We want when ever we decide switch off Iran connection with outer world without any disrupting in our E-government services (yes we know and have E-Government in Iran) .
With national internet (N.I) there is no need for yahoo or Google for you. We have national chat rooms in (N.I) that we could guide you in these rooms. What? You need international! Internet for researching?
- Why don’t you use books like 20 years ago?
With N.I there is no need we waste our money for buying filtering software from American companies for blocking sites which detour you from our heaven .
With this example you found how N.I is important for our Independence:
when you email a letter or request for a Iranian site there is no need that letter or the request first goes to united state (because we have not backbone and hosting ) and read or record by CIA agents then comeback to Iran . In N.I only our agents read your letter and record your activates on the net.
- So please support us in this national project for more independence from the west countries
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many sites block in iran ,sites that are not nor poitical or neither erotic
BBC persian
flickr
B
logrolling
orkut
...

and a lot of personal weblogs.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

So, why does the nation want you isolated?

Francisco From Chile said...

Hi,
I’m a Chilean reporter from El Sábado Magazine, a weekly that goes along with this country’s largest newspaper, El Mercurio. I’m writing an article about the Internet in China and Iran, and I’d appreciate if you could help me with your opinions. My goal is to report this subject with as much direct sources as I can, given that I’m not travelling to see that reality myself.
In concrete, I’m interested in these questions:
-Do you think Internet is making Iran a freer place? How?
-Is Internet a political tool? Is it possible for a repressive regime to totally control it and use it as means for propaganda?
-Do the regular people in Iran think of Internet as a place for expressing views contrary to the government?
-What would you say is the most common mistaken assumption of the West (press, governments, opinion leaders) regarding this subject?
-Do you see any harmful effects of the Internet for the dissidents?
-A story by Joseph Braude in The New Republic says that the advent of the Internet use in Iran might actually be harmful for reformers. “While 100,000 or so Iranians post their passions to the blogosphere, 4,900,000 other users are evidently doing something else. It is well known, for example, that Iranians massively consume Western entertainment--sports media, pop music, and other elements of global culture that the regime in Tehran bans from the public sphere. This injection of hours of hi-speed fun into Iranian homes makes daily life under a theocracy less different from daily life anywhere else--and probably less difficult to tolerate. The advent of Web use in Iran might be less of a net gain for dissidents than many Iran watchers expect because the revolutionary change Iranians want has already arrived. And the truce between the reigning mullahs and their subjects may well have been fortified, rather than undermined, as a result”.
Would you agree with that?
- Is there such a “place” like “Weblogistan” (a land of free speech) or is it just a cool name for blogging in Iran?
- In his story on The Times, Ben Macintyre writes: “Apparently, since the rise of the blogs, graffiti have almost entirely vanished from the walls of Tehran’s public toilets. Could you confirm that?

I sincerely appreciate your help.
Best regards,

Francisco Aravena F.
(faravenaf@mercurio.cl)

Becka said...

I appreciate your blog. I also hope that many people have the oppurtunity to read it. Do not worry your english is rahter good!